Apple Crisp Recipe: Perfect for tailgating!

Apple Crisp Recipe: Perfect for tailgating!

It’s apple-picking season, so pick a few extra to make this yummy Apple Crisp. This recipe will be a big hit when tailgating before a game, or for players who want to refuel after game.

This just one is one of many popular sports-food recipes in my Sports Nutrition Guidebook. Enjoy it!

 Apple Crisp

In this recipe, the small amount of spices allows for a nice apple flavor to shine through the “crisp.” Leaving the peels on the apples not only added fiber and nutrients, but also a nice texture. For a crisp topping, thoroughly work the margarine or butter into the flour by pinching the mixture with your fingers to coat each flour granule.

6 cups sliced apples, preferably half Granny Smith, half Macintosh

1/4-cup sugar

1/2-cup flour, white or whole wheat, as desired (or combination)

1/3 to 1/2 cup sugar, preferably half white, half packed brown sugar

1/4-teaspoon cinnamon

3 to 4 tablespoons margarine or butter, cold from the refrigerator

Optional: 3/4 cup chopped almonds or pecans; 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg; 1/4 teaspoon salt

1. Core, slice, and place the apples in an 8” x 8” baking pan. Sprinkle with 1/4-cup sugar and mix together.

2. Heat oven to 375 degrees F.

3. In a medium bowl, mix together the flour, sugar, and cinnamon (and nutmeg and salt). Add the cold margarine or butter, pinching it into the flour with your fingers until it looks like crumbly wet sand. Add nuts, as desired.

4. Distribute the topping evenly over the apples.

5. Bake for 40 minutes. If you want a crisper topping, turn the oven up to 400 degrees F. for the last five minutes.

Written by Nancy Clark MS RD CSSD

Nancy Clark, MS, RD, CSSD is an internationally respected sports nutritionist, weight coach, nutrition author, and workshop leader. She is a registered dietitian (RD) who is a board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics (CSSD). She is also a certified WellCoach. Nancy specializes in nutrition for performance, life-long health, and the nutritional management of eating disorders. She counsels both casual exercisers and competitive athletes in her private practice in the Boston area (Newton, MA). Some of her clients consider her to be their food coach, others their food therapist. Regardless, she enjoys the challenge of helping sports-active people transform their suboptimal eating habits into effective fueling plans. Nancy Clark's Sports Nutrition Guidebook, a best-selling resource, has sold over 550,000 copies and is now in it's new fifth edition.
Website: http://www.nancyclarkrd.com


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