Getting Older — Like It or Not

Getting Older — Like It or Not

Getting Older — Like It or Not

Like it or not, every one of us is getting older day by day. Both athletes and fitness exercisers alike commonly wonder how aging impacts performance—and what they can do to retain youthful fitness. Exercise physiologist William Evans PhD offers this information to help you chart a healthy course into your golden years.

  1. The average person loses about 1% of their fitness per year. Aerobic capacity goes down, particularly after age 60. Staying active helps maintain a slighter higher ability to uptake oxygen than a non-athlete, but the rate of loss is the same.
  2. We lose muscle as we age, starting as young as age 20, with a steady decline year after year. To treat this age-related loss of muscle, we need to lift weights or do other forms of resistance exercise. Yet, even strong athletes still lose some muscle with aging.
  1. Body fat secretes adipokines (hormones) that have negative effects on muscle strength and contributes to increased inflammation, particularly after ages 60 to 70. Inflammation leads to heart disease and diabetes. Hence, fatness can be a powerful predictor of disability in people ages 50 to 75. Stay lean?
  1. Muscle loss is the key reason why older people become frail and end up in nursing homes. When they stop exercising, they experience a steep drop in strength. The good news is they can do something about frailty: lift weights. In only twelve weeks, 60- to 70-year-old men regained the fitness they had lost over 15 years.
  1. Most strength gains occur in the first 3 months of starting a lifting program due to early neuro-muscular changes. The nervous system learns how to recruit muscles more efficiently and this stimulates more muscle cells.
  1. Strength training helps prevent bone loss. In a year-long study with post-menopausal women, all of the women who lifted weights improved their bone health. Those who did not lift weights lost ~2% bone density in one year. Exercise is better than osteoporosis drugs—plus, you’ll get stronger!

Here’s to staying active and fit, so you can have fun in the years ahead, despite getting older day by day.

Written by Nancy Clark MS RD CSSD

Nancy Clark, MS, RD, CSSD is an internationally respected sports nutritionist, weight coach, nutrition author, and workshop leader. She is a registered dietitian (RD) who is a board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics (CSSD). She is also a certified WellCoach. Nancy specializes in nutrition for performance, life-long health, and the nutritional management of eating disorders. She counsels both casual exercisers and competitive athletes in her private practice in the Boston area (Newton, MA). Some of her clients consider her to be their food coach, others their food therapist. Regardless, she enjoys the challenge of helping sports-active people transform their suboptimal eating habits into effective fueling plans. Nancy Clark's Sports Nutrition Guidebook, a best-selling resource, has sold over 550,000 copies and is now in it's new fifth edition.
Website: http://www.nancyclarkrd.com


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